Superman Gives Captain America an American History Lesson

Dean Cain gained a whole lot of fame when he starred in the hit 1990s television series “Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman.”

Cain played the dual role of the understated Clark Kent and his alter-ego Superman, with actress Teri Hatcher co-starring as Lois Lane.

At the height of its popularity, “Lois and Clark” brought in roughly 15 million viewers per show. Its influence spawned a series of novels, trading cards, and a comic book, which all worked to solidify Cain’s brand as a major player in the “Superman” legacy.

Not only does Cain have the looks to take on the Man of Steel role, he’s got the athletic cred under his belt to make the media magic believable.

While attending high school in Santa Monica, California, the-then teenage Cain played on the same baseball team as future fellow actors Charlie Sheen, Rob Lowe, and Lowe’s brother Chad.

Moving on from high school, Cain attended the prestigious Princeton University, where he became a standout record-breaking free safety on the Princeton Tigers football team.

After graduating from the Ivy League, Cain signed with the National Football League’s Buffalo Bills as a free agent. An unfortunate knee injury during training camp put a halt to his football career.

Pro football’s loss was Hollywood’s gain.

Cain recently became the subject of a Twitter trend, due to some statements that he made about a new Captain America comic book series.

The actor had expressed his displeasure with Marvel’s new comic book series, “The United States of Captain America,” which features a different version of Steve Rogers than fans would expect.

The new sub-patriotic comic book character states that the American Dream is really “…two dreams. And one lie,” adding that for some, it “isn’t real.”

Cain has a sense that the change of direction for the title character is anti-American in nature and appears to be shoehorned into the content of the comic book.

Quoted in the Hollywood Reporter Cain says, “I love the concept of Captain America, but I am so tired of this wokeness and anti-Americanism.”

“In my opinion, America is the greatest country in history. It’s not perfect. We are constantly striving for a more perfect union, but I believe she’s the most fair, equitable country anyone’s ever seen, and that’s why people are clamoring to get here from all over the globe,” he adds.

Cain wonders aloud about whether today’s U.S. critics realize what life is like in other countries around the world.

“Do these people ever travel outside of America?” he asks. “Do they go to other countries where they have to deal with governments who aren’t anywhere near as fair as the United States? I don’t think they do. I do it all the time, and I kiss the soil when I get back.”

Cain also confirms his belief in “individual freedom” and “equality of opportunity,” explaining that these are “what everybody strives for, that’s why they are trying to come here.”

He expresses his concern with how denigrating our nation has become both alarmingly widespread and twistedly fashionable.

“The cool thing to do today is to bash America,” he says. “The comic books do it, the schools, they indoctrinate our kids, they do that, our movies, our television shows are full of it, celebrities, athletes, actors, the media – they love to bash America.”

Still, Cain believes that America can once again be steered in the right direction.

He believes that “the pendulum will swing back to openly appreciating American values, the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, as soon as people start studying them in school again.”

Cain’s sage remarks prompted the usual trolls to launch an all-out social media assault, accompanied by their typical unoriginal profanity-laced claptrap.

Not known for wearing his faith on his sleeve, Cain nevertheless has chosen to lend his star power to a number of faith-based projects, including the 2012 movie “Heaven’s Door,” in which he stars alongside actress Charisma Carpenter in a drama about a young girl who has a near death experience, passes through the Pearly Gates, and acquires the gift of healing.

Cain appeared in the highly successful 2014 film “God’s Not Dead,” which is about a Christian college student whose faith is challenged by an atheist professor, played by actor Kevin Sorbo.

Cain co-starred in the 2018 film “Gosnell: The Trial of America’s Biggest Serial Killer,” which is the gruesome tale of physician and abortionist Kermit Gosnell, who was convicted of numerous felonies that included first degree murder in the deaths of three infants who were born alive.

In 2020 Cain starred with Sorbo in “Faith Under Fire,” a movie in which a firefighter who is trying to cope with his wife’s cancer diagnosis finds that his faith is tested in the process.

Cain’s project this year is “Break Every Chain,” a movie about a police officer who, while battling alcoholism and depression, experiences God’s life-transforming grace.

In the two most recent film projects mentioned above, Cain plays the role of a pastor. He has several more faith-oriented projects in the works, which are currently being filmed or are in post-production.

Although he has generally been private about his religious convictions, a post that is pinned to the top of his Twitter account gives an indication of some of his more deeply held beliefs.

The 2018 post is from the Holy Land. It features a photo of Cain and his son in a sacred place, Bethany beyond the Jordan.

The accompanying tweet reads: “My son and I praying at the exact spot where Jesus was baptized by John the Baptist… Simply Incredible. One of the most holy sites on the planet. #Blessed”

The Cancel Culture Is No Match for Chris Pratt

Chris Pratt is one of the most successful present-day actors in Hollywood.

He first hit it big on the small screen, where he landed the comedic role of Andy Dwyer in the NBC sitcom “Parks and Recreation.”

He then moved on to movies, where he put several more notches in his fame belt for his dramatic roles in “Moneyball,” “Zero Dark Thirty,” and the reboot of “The Magnificent Seven.”

Perhaps even more important to his professional standing, and to the earnings that go along with it, is the fact that he has become an integral part of some profitable tent-pole franchises; namely, the “Guardians of the Galaxy” films, the “Jurassic World” series, and the “Avengers” movies.

Put this all together with movies that are geared toward the youth market, such as “The Lego Movie” and “Onward,” and you have a bonafide super-star on your hands.

Obviously, Pratt works in the extremely “woke” entertainment business. Yet somehow he has been able to freely speak his mind, despite the entertainment industry’s mega-muzzle.

In the lead-up to his most recent film, “The Tomorrow War,” which is currently streaming on Amazon, Pratt posted a social media message that encouraged his followers, as well as the nation, to remember that their rights were purchased by a priceless sacrifice, courtesy of the members of the U.S. military.

“America’s exceptional armed forces have altered the course of the world for the better,” Pratt wrote. “From the Union Army defeating slave-owning Confederates, to the Greatest Generation and her Allies vanquishing the Nazis or our special operators hunting down the perpetrators of 9/11.”

He explained that those who run toward the danger “have given us the most free and decent society planet earth has ever seen.”

Pratt goes on to warn that the quality of decency is a fragile thing and can be lost if we fail to teach young people what freedom means, and if we fail to help them “learn of the selfless sacrifice of our armed service members in the face of oppressive evil.”

He turned his attention toward those who seem to be reflexively putting down our nation.

“…if you use the comments section on posts like this to b—- and moan about America, please understand there are countries in the world where criticizing your government will get you killed or imprisoned,” he said.

He went on to remind those who are seeking to express such views to “never forget your right to free expression is paid for in blood. May God give their souls rest, and may they live in our memories this weekend and always.”

What followed on the social media was disgusting. Activists of the untoward kind castigated Pratt for defending time-honored American values, acknowledging the existence of good and evil, and invoking the Creator’s name.

It’s not the first time Pratt has set off the woke’s alarm clock. In October of 2020, his absence from a Joe Biden campaign fundraiser resulted in a social media snit-storm.

The political fundraiser had offered “Avengers” fans the ability to virtually meet with a group of the series’ stars, if they contributed to the Biden presidential campaign.

Not being present at the event resulted in Pratt becoming the target of an attempted cancellation by some cyber saboteurs, who posted that his absence was an indication that he was a secret Trump supporter; this despite the fact that the actor had never spoken publicly about who he was supporting in the 2020 election.

The push-back on the web was kick-started by a television writer, who posted a meme on Twitter that consisted of four pictures of famous actors named “Chris”: Chris Hemsworth, Chris Evans, Chris Pine, and Chris Pratt. The meme’s caption read, “One has to go.”

Jumping on the post, social media mobsters used it to slander Pratt, with particular animus leveled against his choice of faith and place of worship.

Pratt has not been secretive at all about his devotion to Christianity. His Instagram bio begins with a Bible quote from Philippians 4:13, “I can do all things through Christ which strengthened me.”

He also posted on his Twitter account the words, “I love my family, friends, jokes, Jesus, movies, stories, outdoors, golf.”

He attends a biblically based church in Los Angeles and tells the story of how, when he was a just a teen in Maui, Hawaii, he was introduced to Jesus Christ by a stranger.

He shared some of the details of his introduction to his Savior with Esquire magazine.

The stranger ended up telling him, “I stopped because Jesus told me to stop and talk to you. He said to tell you you’re destined for great things.”

Pratt then made a life-altering decision, announcing to his friends, “Hey, I’m gonna go with this guy.”

He described the moment that forever changed his direction in the following way: “I gave my soul to Jesus within, like, two days. I was stuffing envelopes for his organization, Jews for Jesus.”

In 2017, when he accepted his award for Choice Sci-Fi Actor at the Teen Choice Awards, he spoke passionately about his gratitude to God for the spiritual gift he was given.

“I would not be here with the ease and grace I have in my heart without my Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ,” Pratt said.

Kevin Hart Takes on the Cancel Culture

For decades comedian-actor-producer Kevin Hart has been a Hollywood box-office cash magnet.

Hart has starred in a string of successful films, including “Think Like a Man,” “Grudge Match,” “Ride Along,” “Ride Along 2,” “Central Intelligence,” and the “Jumanji” franchise.

In 2015 Time Magazine saw fit to include him on its annual Time 100 list as one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

In his latest film release, “Fatherhood,” Hart expands his range of character portrayals by taking on the role of a man who struggles to raise his newborn baby girl all on his own, after his wife tragically passes away shortly after giving birth.

In addition to acting, the Hollywood A-lister has also had quite a bit of experience in hosting awards ceremonies. Two major ones in which he can boast include the 2011 BET Awards and the 2012 MTV Video Music Awards.

Following his 2012 MTV host experience, an optimistic Hart appeared to be looking forward to engaging in more work as an emcee, telling the New York Times, “Hopefully after MTV, of course we’re talking Emmys, Oscars, whatever.”

A three-time “Saturday Night Live” host, Hart went on to co-host, along with Dwayne Johnson, the 2016 MTV Movie Awards.

Then in late 2018, he almost got to check another dream host gig off his wish list. It was announced that he would be the host of the 2019 Academy Awards.

The initial excitement over the announcement would be short-lived, though. The cancel culture wound up roaring into Hart’s life in a fierce way.

After 48 hours of social media outrage over some eight-year-old tweets, Hart extricated himself from host responsibilities.

In January 2019, after receiving some strong support from previous Oscar host Ellen DeGeneres, he thought about reconsidering.

However, social media activists were not about to pull back on their attacks against him. Once again Hart announced that he would not be hosting.

The 2019 Academy Awards ceremony was ultimately held minus a host.

It was refreshing when Hart recently made the decision to weigh in on cancel culture. He made headlines for remarks made during an interview with the British Sunday Times.

“When did we get to a point where life was supposed to be perfect? Where people were supposed to operate perfectly all the time?” Hart asked. “I don’t understand. I don’t expect perfection from my kids. I don’t expect it from my wife, friends, employees. Because, last I checked, the only way you grow up is from [screwing] up. I don’t know a kid who hasn’t [messed] up or done some dumb [things].”

According to Hart, because comics are too afraid of being cancelled, comedic arts have suffered a severe blow.

“You’re thinking that things you say will come back and bite you on the [posterior],” he explained, pointing out that people often misunderstand the intent of comedy practitioners.

“There’s an assumption it’s always bad and, somehow, we forgot comedians are going for the laugh,” he added.

News media and social media trolls summarily attacked and ridiculed Hart for daring to question the stifling effects of cancel culture. Strangely, many tried to do so by belittling the actor’s success.

Hart used his twitter account of 37 million followers to respond.

“I rarely talk s***… but I felt the need to today,” Hart posted. “Stop believing these headlines and read the actual articles … you guys fall for the banana in the tail pipe trick every d*** time.”

Social media saboteurs also attempted to claim that Hart is not effective at accomplishing the primary goal of a comedian; that is to simply make people laugh.

“The ‘He’s not funny’ slander is the best … I have been the highest grossing comedian in entertainment for years now … I have also been the highest grossing comedian in the box office with over 4 billion in earnings …,” Hart posted.

Hart’s Christianity has no doubt helped to anchor him in troubled times.

In 2014, during an interview with Oprah Winfrey, he recalled a time early in his career when he was financially unable to pay his rent. He leaned upon Nancy, his faith-filled mother, for help. All she would say at the time was, “Have you been reading your Bible?”

A week went by and things looked like they were going from bad to worse. But Mom kept repeating the admonition, saying, “When you read your Bible, then we’ll talk about your rent.”

Reluctant at the time, the good son nevertheless complied.

“I go home and say, ‘Man let me open this Bible up,’” Hart explained to Winfrey. “Open the Bible up, six rent checks fell out. She put all my rent checks in the Bible.”

Hart would come to realize that more than mere rent had been paid. His Savior had paid his debt to God.

After a serious car accident in September of 2019, he expressed his profound gratitude to God for refocusing his life.

In a video post on Instagram that begins with news broadcast footage reporting the details of the accident, Hart narrates the post with some powerful and heartfelt words.

“When God talks, you gotta listen,” he says. “I swear, life is funny, because some of the craziest things that happen to you end up being the things you needed most.”

“In this case, I honestly feel like God basically told me to sit down,” he says. “When you’re moving too fast and you’re doing too much, sometimes you can’t see the things that you’re meant to see. But after my accident, I see things differently. I see life from a whole new perspective.”

Hart ends the video post with words we can all cling to, saying, “… I’m thankful for God. I’m thankful for life.”

Eric Clapton Targeted by Outrage Mob for Anti-lockdown Song

Legendary recording artist Eric Clapton is a bona fide member of music royalty.

He just happens to be a three-time inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and over the course of his career he has been the recipient of 18 Grammy Awards.

Something a lot of folks may not know is that Clapton was a member of a number of awe-inspiring rock and blues ensembles, including The Yardbirds, Cream, John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers, Blind Faith, Delaney & Bonnie and Friends, and Derek and the Dominos.

One particular endeavor of Clapton that holds personal significance for me is his nurturing and archiving of America’s musical treasure, The Blues.

His style of playing and choice of material reflects his own influences: famed artists Muddy Waters, B.B. King, Freddie King, Albert King, and Buddy Guy, among others.

Clapton collaborated on an album with B.B. King and released CDs that featured the work of Delta Blues master Robert Johnson.

After a long and illustrious career, Clapton is now having to endure the unimaginable—an onslaught of digital venom from the cancel culture.

The outrage mob that lurks in the shadows of social media slander circles currently has its sights set on destroying a heretofore sterling career and reputation of the iconic singer, songwriter, record producer, and guitarist.

What did Clapton do to deserve the onslaught of Internet hate?

He and fellow musical artist Van Morrison recently announced that the two of them would be releasing a protest song that related to government lockdowns, which have been imposed on people around the globe, all in the name of public health.

The tune is titled “Stand and Deliver.” Morrison, who wrote the song, is a musical legend in his own right, having been the front man for the seminal rock group, Them. He also skyrocketed to stardom as a solo artist with a distinctive soul brand all his own.

In a statement to Variety, Clapton characterized the lack of live music due to lockdowns as “deeply upsetting.”

“There are many of us who support Van and his endeavors to save live music; he is an inspiration,” Clapton said. “We must stand up and be counted because we need to find a way out of this mess.”

Morrison praised Clapton for having participated in the tune, saying, “Eric’s recording is fantastic and will clearly resonate with the many who share our frustrations.”

In addition to “Stand and Deliver,” Morrison is set this week to release three other protest-themed songs: “No More Lockdown,” “As I Walked Out,” and “Born to Be Free.”

The songs portray the coronavirus lockdowns as “fascist” and also hit Hollywood celebs for “telling us what we’re supposed to feel.”

Proceeds from the recordings go to Morrison’s initiative for musicians who are struggling as a fallout of the lockdowns.

Using music as a protest vehicle is a time honored tradition that dates back to the singer-songwriters of the 1960s. However, in today’s left-of-center’s warped selective embrace of censorship, musical expressions that contradict the agenda of the elitist class must be stricken from the public square.

As a result of the recording of the song and the public announcement of its release, Clapton has suffered a barrage of social media vitriol, including a sizable amount from members of the outrage mob, who dragged out statements of Clapton from more than 40 years ago.

This was an unfortunate time for the musical artist, a period in his life when he was in addiction’s dreadful grip. His remarks, which were made back in 1976, were featured on the Twitter account of singer-songwriter Deren Ney, who wrote that “all of [Clapton’s] racism wouldn’t fit in one screenshot.”

A band called The Mountain Goats, which had released a song about the pandemic, attacked both Clapton and Morrison in a tweet, and threw a number of expletives in for supposed effect. Numerous other tweets were posted on the web, accusing Clapton of being a racist.

The Vulture website joined in with the digital assault, and also threw in some politics in its citing of the “climb in COVID-19 cases.”

In another politicized piece, The Los Angeles Times noted that “Twitter is not amused” by Clapton’s taking a position against lockdowns in song. The publication then wagged its accusatory racist finger.

Despite failed models, questionable data, and nonsensical demands from government, millions of protesters have taken to the streets in the U.S., European countries, and international communities.

It could be that the politicization of the coronavirus has reached its zenith, thanks in part to Clapton and Morrison.

Music has that magical effect. It can reach into our souls and drown out all the unwelcome noise.