The Clintons Partner Up with Hollywood

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Where do you go after you suffer two losses in a back-to-back bid to secure a coveted Oval Office seat? If you are a tried-and-true Democrat with a tried and true far-left following, you’re going to Hollywood!

Magically floating into your hands is that golden ticket to the place where wads of cash, advertisement endorsements, and tons of adulation await you from your like-minded friends who populate the hillside mansions of Tinseltown.

Secure enough in their apparent belief that Hollywood studios are going to roll out the red carpet, Hillary Clinton and her daughter Chelsea have put together a production company, the purpose of which is to create film and television projects.

True to what the Clintons are famous for, particularly when it comes to their Hollywood connections, Hillary and Chelsea are reportedly on a quest for money for their entertainment vehicle. Seemingly not content with having been first lady of Arkansas, New York senator, first lady of the nation, secretary of state, presidential candidate two-times-over, and best-selling author, Hillary, along with her daughter in tag, wants to “influence culture and society” via entertainment; this according to Bloomberg.

“Hillary is still very popular out here and there’s been conversations with several studios and streamers about working on projects together,” a top-tier executive told Deadline.

Reports indicate that the Clintons will focus on, not surprisingly, women. The projects will purportedly be made by women and for women, and additionally will be about women, according to Bloomberg.

Studio executives have already been contacted about financing content for the Clinton upstart company, and there’s one thing that the Clintons and Hollywood certainly have in common. That would be something affectionately known as creative accounting.

Now you may be asking yourself, What qualifications and expertise do Hillary and her daughter actually bring to the film and television production table?

Well, in 2011 Chelsea was able to obtain a position as a special correspondent for the NBC News show “Making A Difference,” which earned her an annual salary of $600,000, despite the fact that she didn’t have any credible prior reporting experience. During her three-year stint at NBC, though, she was able to provide some no doubt riveting reporting about The Clinton Foundation, and a hard-hitting interview with the Geico Gecko.

And in 2018 Hillary herself was hired to be the executive producer of Steven Spielberg’s “The Women’s Hour,” which is a TV drama that deals with women securing the right to vote. Adapted from the book titled “The Woman’s Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote,” the plot deals with the women’s suffrage movement and the battle over the ratification of the 19th Amendment.

Would Hollywood let political cronyism affect its choice of business partner? Perish the thought.

It could be that Hillary was haunted by that green-eyed monster when former President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle created a production company called “Higher Ground Productions,” which reportedly made a lucrative deal with Netflix. From the Clintons’ perspective, if their Hollywood friends are handing creative power and cash over to the Obamas, there must be some that could be slipped their way.

The type of content that the Clintons will supposedly be creating may be similar to the content the Obamas have in their initial slate of Netflix projects that are currently in production, which include the following:

-a children’s show for preschoolers called “Listen to Your Vegetables & Eat Your Parents”;

-a narrative film adaptation of the biography of Frederick Douglass;

-a series from the creator of “Nashville,” which is set in New York and depicts barriers faced by women and individuals of color;

-a New York Times series “Overlooked,” which focuses on obituaries of notable figures from history who were previously ignored by the press, i.e., women and minorities.

One more project the Obamas have in the making, which is so unsurprising it’s flat-out boring, is an adaptation of an anti-Trump book by Michael Lewis, titled “The Fifth Risk.” The former president and first lady’s company will additionally partner with another tech-entertainment company, Spotify, to develop podcasts presumably with more “woke” themes.

Meanwhile Hillary may have finally found the hobby that she had been looking for: Shaking down Hollywood execs in order to finance female-centric projects. Because Hollywood decision makers abandoned business principles a long time ago, she is likely to be able to obtain financing for some agenda-laden products that few, if any, will want to see.

As an added benefit from all of this, we are able to get a sneak preview of what Joe Biden will be able to do with himself after he loses.

Netflix Gets a Hollywood Makeover

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Netflix has just turned its back on the Silicon Valley tech firms in a move that signals a seismic shift in the entertainment business.

The streaming video giant pulled out of the Internet Association, which is the lobbying entity for web-based businesses, and locked arms with Silicon Valley’s nemesis, the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), Hollywood’s preeminent lobbying organization.

The Internet Association is a highly influential trade group that represents the biggest technology companies in the world, including Google, Facebook, and Amazon. The MPAA members are the six studio giants of Hollywood: Disney, Paramount, Sony, 21st Century Fox, Universal, and Warner Bros.

Although the tech firms of Silicon Valley and the entertainment companies of Hollywood have some common interests, they are on opposite sides when it comes to copyright protection and statutory immunities that are of benefit to Internet intermediaries.

Because of recent data scandals and charges of censorship by the largest tech firms, U.S. lawmakers are raising questions about two existing statutes: 1) Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which shields Internet concerns from liability for content published by their users; and 2) The safe harbor provision of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which helps to protect such firms from copyright claims.

Hollywood, via the MPAA, has been pursuing more severe anti-piracy measures in an effort to prod Internet intermediaries into taking steps to prevent and remove illegal content that has been uploaded by users.

Immediately after Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg made an appearance in Washington, D.C. before a congressional committee, MPAA head Charles Rivkin requested that Congress begin looking into the possibility of holding Internet platforms accountable, which, of course, raised the specter of government regulation.

Rivken’s rhetoric infuriated Internet Association’s Michael Beckerman, who characterized the MPAA leader’s calls to regulate Internet companies as “shameless rent-seeking.”

Netflix is looking to the MPAA to assist in helping the streaming company expand into markets that in the past have proven to be difficult, if not impossible, to penetrate, which has been especially true with regard to China and India.

Netflix gradually morphed into a different entity from what it was at its onset. In the beginning, Netflix was a streaming platform that hosted third-party content and served as an alternative to Blockbuster and other video rental stores. The Netflix of today, though, is a full blown mega-studio, having reportedly spent about $13 billion on content just last year. Its service seeks to actively pair up content with needs and preferences of its subscribers.

In a recent letter to investors, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings indicated that because of the company’s success in producing original content, it plans to move away from outside programming and make content production the company’s primary objective.

Once dismissed by the industry as an entertainment flash in the pan and a mere rerun platform, Netflix has reshaped the way in which the public consumes entertainment. The industry realized that Netflix had become a threat to traditional entertainment business models, so CEOs sought comfort in mega-mergers and the establishment of new streaming services.

AT&T acquired Time Warner, and the newly formed entity presently has plans to launch a streaming service later in the year. Disney is also set to launch a streaming service, following its pending acquisition of 21st Century Fox. And Comcast will reportedly get into the streaming service business as well, after its acquisition of NBCUniversal is completed.

Netflix recently shocked its subscribers with its biggest price increase ever. A recent survey by Streaming Observer and Mindnet Analytics reveals that Netflix might lose up to 27% of its subscribers due to the price hike.

Another factor that poses a threat to Netflix’s bottom line is that major streaming service competitor Hulu reportedly has plans to lower its monthly charge from $7.99 to $5.99, starting at the end of February 2019.

Netflix is likely to lose much of its licensed third-party content at approximately the same time that Disney’s much-anticipated streamer is launched, complete with entertainment fare from its “Star Wars,” Marvel, and Pixar catalogues.

The current corporate model of Netflix is predicated on rapid growth. However, it now looks as though Netflix will have the brakes applied as emerging competition from Hollywood causes the streaming business to go through a remake.